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Improving the Community College Transfer Pathway to the Baccalaureate: The Effect of California’s Associate Degree for Transfer

The transfer between two-year and four-year colleges is a critical path to baccalaureate attainment. Yet, students face a number of barriers in transfer pathways, including a lack of coherent coordination and articulation between their community colleges and four-year institutions, resulting in excess units and increased time to degree. In this paper we evaluate the impact of California’s Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act, which aimed to create a more seamless pathway between the Community Colleges and the California State University. We investigate whether the reform effort met its intended goal of improving baccalaureate receipt, and greater efficiency in earning these degrees, among community college transfer students. We tease out plausibly causal effects of the policy by leveraging the exogenous variation in the timing of the implementation of the reform in different campuses and fields of study. We find that this reform effort has led to significant reductions in time to baccalaureate receipt among community college transfers and reduced total unit accumulation. These positive effects were shared across all student subgroups.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI)
10.26300/569x-2a48

EdWorkingPaper suggested citation:

Baker, Rachel, Elizabeth Friedmann, and Michal Kurlaender. (). Improving the Community College Transfer Pathway to the Baccalaureate: The Effect of California’s Associate Degree for Transfer. (EdWorkingPaper: -359). Retrieved from Annenberg Institute at Brown University: https://doi.org/10.26300/569x-2a48

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