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Informing school-choosing families about their options: A field experiment from New Orleans

In order for school choice reforms to fulfill their potential, school choosers must be informed about their options. We conducted a randomized controlled trial during the school choice application period in New Orleans to assess the effects of providing information to parents. Families with children entering pre-K, kindergarten, or ninth grade were assigned to one of two treatment groups or a control group. A “performance” group received lists of the highest-performing schools or programs available (via U.S. mail, email, and text message). A “neighborhood” group received lists of the schools or programs in their home geographic zone. We find that the performance treatment made applicants significantly more likely to request high-performing schools, though the effects were concentrated among high school choosers. The performance treatment had especially strong effects among families of students with disabilities. The neighborhood treatment had only modest effects. We consider these findings in the context of questions about the role of information in school choice markets, as well as which families may be in particular need of support.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI)
10.26300/14fy-zk30

EdWorkingPaper suggested citation:

Valant, Jon, and Lindsay Weixler. (). Informing school-choosing families about their options: A field experiment from New Orleans. (EdWorkingPaper: -325). Retrieved from Annenberg Institute at Brown University: https://doi.org/10.26300/14fy-zk30

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