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School Segregation in the Era of Color-blind Jurisprudence and School Choice

The decades-long resistance to federally imposed school desegregation entered a new phase at the turn of the new century, when federal courts stopped pushing racial balance as a remedy for past segregation, adopting in its place a color-blind approach in judging local school districts’ assignment plans. Using data that span 1998 to 2016 from North Carolina, one of the first states to come under this color-blind dictum, we examine the ways in which households and policymakers took actions that had the effect of reducing the amount of interracial contact in K-12 schools within counties. We divide these reductions in interracial contact into portions due to the private school and charter school sectors, the existence of multiple school districts, and racial disparities between schools within districts and sectors. For most counties, the last of these proves to be the biggest, though in some counties private schools, charter schools, or multiple districts played a deciding role. In addition, we decompose segregation in the state’s 13 metropolitan areas, finding that more than half can be attributed to racial disparities inside school districts. We also measure segregation by economic status, finding that it, like racial segregation, increased in the largest urban counties, but elsewhere changed little over the period.

Keywords
school segregation, race and education, charter schools
Education level
Document Object Identifier (DOI)
10.26300/wc3k-ht80

EdWorkingPaper suggested citation:

Clotfelter, Charles T., Steven W. Hemelt, Helen F. Ladd, and Mavzuna Turaeva. (). School Segregation in the Era of Color-blind Jurisprudence and School Choice. (EdWorkingPaper: -101). Retrieved from Annenberg Institute at Brown University: https://doi.org/10.26300/wc3k-ht80

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