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The role of student effort on performance in PISA: Revisiting the gender gap in achievement

International assessments are important to benchmark the quality of education across countries. However, on low-stakes tests, students’ incentives to invest their maximum effort may be minimal. Research stresses that ignoring students’ effort when interpreting results from low-stakes assessments can lead to biased interpretations of test performance across groups of examinees. We use data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a low-stakes test, to analyze the extent to which student effort helps to explain test scores heterogeneity across countries and by gender groups. Our results highlight the importance of accounting for differences in student effort to understand cross-country heterogeneity in performance and variations in gender achievement gaps across nations. We find that, once we account for differential student effort across gender groups, the estimated gender achievement gap in math and science could be up to 12 and 6 times wider, respectively, and up to 49 percent narrower in reading, in favor of boys. In math and science, the gap widens in most countries, even among some of the top 20 most gender-equal countries. Altogether, our effort measures on average explain between 36 and 40 percent of the cross-country variation in test scores.

Keywords
Student Effort, Gender Gaps, Rapid guessing, PISA 2015
Education level
Document Object Identifier (DOI)
10.26300/f056-5t92

EdWorkingPaper suggested citation:

Anaya, Lina M., and Gema Zamarro. (). The role of student effort on performance in PISA: Revisiting the gender gap in achievement . (EdWorkingPaper: -295). Retrieved from Annenberg Institute at Brown University: https://doi.org/10.26300/f056-5t92

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