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Understanding how COVID-19 has Changed Teachers’ Chances of Remaining in the Classroom

The 2020-2021 academic year was a trying year for teachers. We use a nationally representative sample of teachers from the RAND American Teacher Panel to document that teachers’ stated consideration of leaving the profession increased during the pandemic. We also study factors associated with teachers’ consideration of leaving the profession and high levels of job burnout during the pandemic. Approaching retirement age (being 55 or older), having to change instruction modes, health concerns, and high levels of job burnout all appear to be important predictors of the probability of considering leaving or retiring from teaching. Hybrid teaching increased consideration of leaving the profession because of COVID. Health concerns and switching instruction modes are all associated with higher levels of concern about job burnout. Interestingly, those approaching retirement ages do not present higher levels of concern about job burnout than younger teachers. Although increased consideration of leaving and concern about burnout do not yet appear to have materialized into higher attrition rates so far, higher levels of job dissatisfaction could affect teacher effectiveness and could harm student academic progress.

Keywords
Teacher turnover, teacher retention, job burnout, COVID-19
Education level
Document Object Identifier (DOI)
10.26300/2y0g-bw09

EdWorkingPaper suggested citation:

Zamarro, Gema, Andrew Camp, Dillon Fuchsman, and Josh B. McGee. (). Understanding how COVID-19 has Changed Teachers’ Chances of Remaining in the Classroom. (EdWorkingPaper: 22-542). Retrieved from Annenberg Institute at Brown University: https://doi.org/10.26300/2y0g-bw09

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