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What Happened to the K-12 Education Labor Market During COVID? The Acute Need for Better Data Systems

The COVID-19 pandemic upended the U.S. education system and the economy in ways that dramatically affected the jobs of K-12 educators. However, data limitations have led to considerable uncertainty and conflicting reports about the nature of staffing challenges in schools. We draw on education employment data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and State Education Agencies (SEA) to describe patterns in K-12 education employment and to highlight the limitations of available data. Data from the BLS suggest overall employment in the K-12 labor market declined by 9.3 percent at the onset of the pandemic and remains well below pre-pandemic levels. SEA data suggest that teachers have not (yet) left the profession in mass as many predicted, but that turnover decreased in the summer of 2020. We explore possible explanations for these patterns including (1) weak hiring through the summer of 2020 and (2) high attrition among K-12 instructional support staff. State vacancy data also suggest that schools are facing substantial challenges filling open positions during the 2021-22 academic year. Our analyses illustrate the imperative to build more timely, detailed, and nationally representative data systems on the K-12 education labor market to better inform policy.  

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Document Object Identifier (DOI)
10.26300/2xw0-v642

EdWorkingPaper suggested citation:

Bleiberg, Joshua, and Matthew A. Kraft. (). What Happened to the K-12 Education Labor Market During COVID? The Acute Need for Better Data Systems. (EdWorkingPaper: 22-544). Retrieved from Annenberg Institute at Brown University: https://doi.org/10.26300/2xw0-v642

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