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The Long-Run Impacts of Universal Pre-K: Evidence from the First Statewide Program

Nearly all studies of preschool’s long-run effects examine means-tested programs; little is known about the long-run effects of universal programs. A number of key differences—including population served, scale, and counterfactual options—may cause universal programs to have different effects than previously studied means-tested programs. Using a difference-in-differences framework, I estimate the effects of Georgia’s first-in-the-nation statewide universal pre-K program on adult educational attainment and employment. The program made children 4.5 percent more likely to graduate from high school and 13.7 percent more likely to obtain a bachelor’s degree (although the latter effect is imprecise). I find similar results in a supplemental analysis that uses the synthetic control method. I find no effects on associate degree attainment or employment.

Keywords
Georgia, universal preschool, state-funded pre-K, long-run effects, educational attainment, labor market outcomes
Education level
Document Object Identifier (DOI)
10.26300/k4bh-0114

EdWorkingPaper suggested citation:

Berne, Jordan S.. (). The Long-Run Impacts of Universal Pre-K: Evidence from the First Statewide Program. (EdWorkingPaper: 22-626). Retrieved from Annenberg Institute at Brown University: https://doi.org/10.26300/k4bh-0114

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